Let it never be said the New York Times isn’t hip

Credit: John Steven FernandezFrom the Feb. 2 print edition of the Times, to begin an article about new restaurant uses for pepperoni:ACROSS the United States, artisanal pizza joints are opening faster than Natalie Portman movies.Cue the eye-roll. Even after I consider by March, she'll have had three films released since Dec. 1 in the U.S.…Read more Let it never be said the New York Times isn’t hip

"Going forward," "stakeholders" should stop using "jargon"

Or try to. From The Economist (found at its delightful Tumblr):It is reported in London that William Hague, Britain's foreign secretary, has been shocked by the poor spelling and jargon-infested English he finds in notes from his diplomats.Such obviously bad English isn't reserved for government or Britain, nor is it limited to writing. Briefly, on…Read more "Going forward," "stakeholders" should stop using "jargon"

Success and failure can hinge on a single word

Headline mistakes are rarely, in my experience, of a deliberate action. They are almost of an oversight, a mistyping or confusion. And most of the time, it's but one word or phrase that makes the difference -- its spelling, its substitution for the correct word, or its placement. All this places added pressure on copy…Read more Success and failure can hinge on a single word

Headlines, content, audience — 3 things that must align

People generally like to read things that journalists don't care for. And journalists tend to write things they think are must-reads, and to which the public responds -- occasionally.Sometimes, the "important" stories truly are, but are never read. And often, the dumbest stories or the least journalistic are wildly popular. All of these stories, too,…Read more Headlines, content, audience — 3 things that must align